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Friday night, November 8th, every metalhead and rock enthusiast in Hollywood had two choices: Nine Inch Nails or Lamb of God. For those who chose the latter…well done.

The Resolution Tour descended upon the Hollywood Palladium Friday evening for one of the year’s biggest nights in metal and the much-anticipated return of the almighty Lamb of God. The loudest show in LA was kicked off by the female-fronted Huntress and thrash veterans Testament, each doing their respective part to appease the capacity Palladium crowd.

Every band on the bill contributed in making this particular Resolution Tour stop one of the genre’s best outings of the year, but Killswitch Engage made it official. The return of Jesse Leach to KSE is one of the best things to happen to hard rock and metal, and the chemistry of Killswitch’s members on stage (particularly the antics of guitarist Adam D, who at one point handed out a tray of beans to the front row) makes them one of the most entertaining ensembles in rock music.

Tracks such as “My Curse” and Disarm the Descent’s “In Due Time” turned the Palladium into a fist-pumping sing-along, but the crowd’s participation on the chorus of “My Last Serenade” was the highlight of an all-around impressive evening of music.

And can I point out that no band rocks harder in shorts than Killswitch?

The Palladium crowd, which was going just as strong as during minute one of Huntress, rejoiced when Lamb of God frontman Randy Blythe first entered the stage for “Desolation.” His entrance was preceded by projected scenes of wildfires and collapsing buildings that set up a thunderous drum section to kick off the set. Quickly followed by “Ghost Walking” and “Walk With Me in Hell,” fans had no time to catch their breath.

The entire set was a testament to why Lamb Of God has one of the most legendary live shows in the genre, but it was the infamous Wall of Death, called for by Blythe during the night-ending “Black Label,” that pushed the show (and concertgoers) over the edge.

Everything after that is a big, sweaty blur.