1993 in music

This morning Buzzfeed released a list of 29 albums that turn 20 years old this year. While I had yet to even have a double-digit number of years under my own belt when 1993 kicked off, I was already firmly under the spell of music, so quite a few of the albums on their list brought back memories, often rather embarrassing ones.

At the time, I was teetering between a love of what I would now consider “respectable” music and those undeniably catchy pop tracks that compelled me to spend every 2 dollars I could wrangle from my parents on a litany of cassette singles. Of the albums on Buzzfeed’s list, I remember owning three in full — Radiohead’s Pablo Honey, Counting Crows’ August and Everything After, and Sheryl Crow’s Tuesday Night Music Club — and I’m pretty certain those came courtesy of one of those “12 CDs for a Penny” clubs my mom belonged to (do those still exist?).

As for the tracks from 1993 that I couldn’t get enough of, Prince’s “Seven,” SWV’s “Weak,” Four Non Blondes’ “What’s Up?” and Aerosmith’s “Livin’ on the Edge” were all listened to ad naseum. In retrospect, I was also starting to develop a penchant for songs with “love” in the title judging from the memories brought back by the songs “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That)” (Meat Loaf), “Another Sad Love Song” (Toni Braxton), and of course the Three Musketeers soundtrack collaboration “All for Love” (Bryan Adams, Rod Stewart, and Sting). Romantic-in-training, I suppose.

I always remember 1994 as being the year of the releases that would go on to form my “adult” taste in music, thanks in part to the release of Weezer’s self-titled “Blue Album” and Green Day’s Dookie, but 1993 is definitely good for some nostalgic “What was I thinking?” chuckles. Now that I’ve shared my embarrassing musical favorites from two decades ago, let me know in the comments what songs monopolized 1993 for you.